Essay On Save Tigers Posters

Tigers, among the planet's most iconic and secretive creatures, have been near the top of the endangered list for some time. But yesterday, a landmark study by leading conservationists warned that their plight is even more serious than previously feared.

The big cat, the report warns, is close to extinction and the area in which it lives has been nearly halved in the last 10 years.

The area occupied by tigers is 41% smaller than 10 years ago and is just 7% of its historical "range" before habitat loss and hunting slashed its numbers, according to scientists at the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York, the World Wildlife Fund and the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington. Tigers once ranged across Asia from eastern Turkey to the Russian far east.

In India, for example, where 60% of the world's tigers live, the population fell from 100,000 in the 19th century to 3,600 now. Many researchers believe the true figure is less than half the official estimate.

"The current trajectory will surely cause wild populations to disappear in many places, or shrink to the point of 'ecological extinction' - where their numbers are too few to play their role as the top predator," the authors write. "Now more than ever, tigers need homeland security." This grim prediction will come true in 20 years, the authors estimate, unless urgent action is taken.

The study is a follow-up to similar work carried out in 1995. It draws together satellite data on habitat type, information on poaching in different regions and data on tiger numbers.

Counting tigers is notoriously difficult because they are extremely secretive and very spread out. Data is collected either by counting paw prints or setting camera traps which snap unsuspecting tigers on their nightly prowl.

The study, paid for by the Save the Tiger Fund, identifies 76 "tiger conservation landscapes" - places with habitat which has the best chance of supporting viable tiger populations. Half would be able to support 100 tigers or more.

The grim headline figure is not simply a measure of how much tiger habitat has been destroyed since 1995, although much has been lost. The data take into account whether habitat that has become fragmented would be big enough to support a tiger population. The cats are reluctant to cross open areas and so need well connected forest. Also, it takes into account whether heavy poaching of the tigers' prey means that there would not be enough food for females to raise cubs.

"The last decade has been catastrophic for tigers and they simply can't afford another one like that," said Eric Dinerstein, chief scientist with WWF and one of the study's authors. But the news is not all bad, he said. "Like the Dow Jones, there are some stocks that are up while the rest are down."

The tiger population in the Russian far east, for example, has increased over the past half century from around 50 to 500. Also, the survey shows that targeted conservation efforts can pay off. "Just by applying a little bit of protection, they can rebound dramatically," said Dr Dinerstein. Tigers breed quickly for a large mammal and do not require pristine habitat to survive, so preventing poaching can lead to a rapid recovery of a local population. Apart from physical habitat destruction, the main threat comes from hunters. A tiger skin can fetch more than £5,000 and the penises, used in traditional Chinese medicine, are worth £14,000 a kilo.

"A lot of money is involved and a lot of people are involved," said Tito Joseph with the Wildlife Protection Society of India. Criminal gangs with links to drugs and arms trading smuggle tiger parts from India to China and Tibet. Skins are popular as garments called chubbas, and are also traded to collectors in the west.

Contrary to popular belief, tiger penises are not used as an aphrodisiac in Chinese medicine, but in cures for fevers and rheumatism. The Chinese government and NGOs are working with traditional medicine sellers to promote alternatives. The bones of a common mole rat called the sailong are now often used.

"There is cause for optimism," said Sabri Zain, advocacy and campaign director of Traffic, an NGO that combats illegal wildlife trade. "In terms of trade there is an appreciable reduction in demand for tiger bone-based medicine."

The authors of the report - Setting Priorities for the Conservation and Recovery of Wild Tigers 2005-2015 - advocate a "tiger summit", involving the heads of state of the 13 countries which still host the species. They believe this would galvanise political will and raise funds for conservation. To safeguard the remaining animals, the report says increased protection of the 20 most important tiger habitat areas should be a priority. Of the six tiger sub-species, the Javan tiger, Caspian tiger and Bali tiger have already become extinct.

There are only 1411 tigers left in India, constantly living in danger and on the brink of extinction. Find out why you should teach your kids to worry about the threat to tigers and how the death of tigers affects the environment. Find out what children can do to “Save the Tiger” here. The tiger ruled supreme all throughout Asia in the 1900s. From the grasslands of Central India and the taiga of Siberia, to the bamboo forests of China; tigers owned the forests, fearlessly preying on the Herbivores and keeping people from tearing down the forests to make way for industrial processes. Today, from an astonishing 100,000 in 1900s, there are only an approximated 1411 tigers left in the jungles of India, constantly living in danger and on the brink of extinction. Why Should We Worry if the Tiger is Dying Out? Tigers are responsible for the well-being of the forests. Being on the top of the food chain, the tiger preys on herbivorous animals like the deer and boar, thereby keeping their population in check. Without predators like the tiger, herbivorous animals would destroy the fragile jungles. Fear of tigers and other predators also prevents poor people from entering the jungle and cutting down trees for cultivation or industrial purposes. Extinction of tigers would mean that jungles are at risk of destruction from poor people trying to make a living from farming, logging and poaching. Therefore, presence of the tiger means stability in forests. Why Do We Need Forests? Uneducated and selfish ministers in power refuse to protect tigers as they want the jungles to be demolished to make way for industrial development such as cement manufacturing and aluminium mining. These industrial processes will turn the forests into wastelands, leading to dumping of poisonous garbage and toxins into the land that is responsible for protecting our fragile eco-system. Death of tigers will destroy forests which will deplete our water supply. Jungles absorb rainwater during monsoon, and transpire that moisture into the atmosphere which precipitates to form rain in time for the monsoon season again. Rainwater forges underground water bodies which rise to the surface over time and distance to become streams and rivers which flow even when the monsoon season is over, thereby providing drinking water to a number of villages and towns. 300 such streams and rivers emerge from just 41 tiger reserves in India! If tigers become extinct, jungles will definitely die. That would lead to floods in the monsoon as there will be forests left to absorb the rain, which in turn will cause droughts once the rain has stopped. All because some people believe that making money today is more important than saving nature for tomorrow. Threat to Tigers Destruction of Natural Habitat The tiger’s natural habitat is being destroyed all over India for timber, agriculture or manufacturing purposes. Depletion of forests leads to the number of animals that the tiger can prey on also dwindling. Tigers then enter villages and attack farm animals and villagers in search of food which causes villagers to kill the tigers to protect themselves and their livestock. Inbreeding Owing to depletion of forest lands, streaks of tigers get disconnected from each other by human territory which means that the range of tigers that other tigers can mate with reduces drastically. Inbreeding with a small range of tigers weakens the gene pool, causing birth defects and mutations, which would eventually lead to extinction. Poaching While hunting tigers merely for sport has become almost non-existent, there are a lot of poachers who kill tigers to make money by selling tiger skins, bones and claws. Some honest forest guards and conservationists try to protect the tiger reserves, but in vain. It is believed that poachers are killing one tiger every day! What can kids do to Save the Tiger! Empower your child to believe that even ONE small person can make a big difference in the fight to save tigers from extinction. There are a multitude of things that kids can do to show their support. To begin with, you could enroll them in Kids for Tigers or any other Save the Tiger organisation. Here are some more suggestions for what kids can do: Organise a Rally Encourage your child to spread the “Save the Tiger” message by organising or participating in a rally. All he needs to do is invite a few of his and your friends who share the same interest and show their support with posters and pamphlets in support of the tiger in some public place. Start a Petition If tigers dwell in nearby forest, encourage and help your child to start a signature campaign to provide protection and declare the area as a tiger reserve. Create awareness about the area, the plight of the tigers and their importance in our eco-system. Get as many people as you can to sign the petition, and enlist the aid of a tiger conservation organisation to ensure that the local government hears your message loud and clear. Establish or Join a Nature Club or NGO Encourage your child to organise and invite family and friends, teachers and neighbours for activities like nature walks and bird-watching to make them appreciate and respect nature and the environment. You can also help him access images from a tiger conservation group and organise an audio-visual in his school to spread the “Save the Tiger” message. Write to the Government and Newspapers Help your child draft a letter to either the Prime Minister or the Chief Minister. Ask them to introduce measures and step up their efforts to “Save the Tiger.” In case you observe or know off any activity that will adversely affect the environment, report it to local newspapers to ensure that the wrong-doers do not get away with it. Collect Money to fund Tiger Conservation Organisations Encourage your child to think of innovative ways to collect money for tiger conservation. He could sell home-made cards, cakes or cookies, etc. during a fair or a sports day, etc. Help your child come up with various methods to collect money from your friends and family and donate it to a tiger conservation organisation. Take Care of Mother Nature Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. Conserve water while brushing and showering; turn off the light when you leave a room; switch off the computer monitor if you are taking a break of more than ten minutes; use recycled paper; keep your air conditioner at 24 degrees. Choose cloth or paper bags over plastic bags. Save fuel - Walk, cycle, take public transport or start a carpool! All these small changes in your life will help you and your kids save Mother Nature and do your bit towards saving the Earth’s resources and by extension help “Save the Tiger.” Do you know why you should worry if tigers are on the brink of extinction? How can you teach your child to be aware of and take care of Mother Nature? What can children do to Save the Tiger? Discuss here.



There are only 1411 tigers left in India, constantly living in danger and on the brink of extinction. Find out why you should teach your kids to worry about the threat to tigers and how the death of tigers affects the environment. Find out what children can do to “Save the Tiger” here.

The tiger ruled supreme all throughout Asia in the 1900s. From the grasslands of Central India and the taiga of Siberia, to the bamboo forests of China; tigers owned the forests, fearlessly preying on the Herbivores and keeping people from tearing down the forests to make way for industrial processes.

Today, from an astonishing 100,000 in 1900s, there are only an approximated 1411 tigers left in the jungles of India, constantly living in danger and on the brink of extinction.


Why Should We Worry if the Tiger is Dying Out?

Tigers are responsible for the well-being of the forests. Being on the top of the food chain, the tiger preys on herbivorous animals like the deer and boar, thereby keeping their population in check. Without predators like the tiger, herbivorous animals would destroy the fragile jungles. Fear of tigers and other predators also prevents poor people from entering the jungle and cutting down trees for cultivation or industrial purposes. Extinction of tigers would mean that jungles are at risk of destruction from poor people trying to make a living from farming, logging and poaching. Therefore, presence of the tiger means stability in forests.


Why Do We Need Forests?

Uneducated and selfish ministers in power refuse to protect tigers as they want the jungles to be demolished to make way for industrial development such as cement manufacturing and aluminium mining. These industrial processes will turn the forests into wastelands, leading to dumping of poisonous garbage and toxins into the land that is responsible for protecting our fragile eco-system.

Death of tigers will destroy forests which will deplete our water supply. Jungles absorb rainwater during monsoon, and transpire that moisture into the atmosphere which precipitates to form rain in time for the monsoon season again. Rainwater forges underground water bodies which rise to the surface over time and distance to become streams and rivers which flow even when the monsoon season is over, thereby providing drinking water to a number of villages and towns. 300 such streams and rivers emerge from just 41 tiger reserves in India!

If tigers become extinct, jungles will definitely die. That would lead to floods in the monsoon as there will be forests left to absorb the rain, which in turn will cause droughts once the rain has stopped. All because some people believe that making money today is more important than saving nature for tomorrow.


Threat to Tigers

Destruction of Natural Habitat

The tiger’s natural habitat isbeing destroyed all over India for timber, agriculture or manufacturing purposes. Depletion of forests leads to the number of animals that the tiger can prey on also dwindling. Tigers then enter villages and attack farm animals and villagers in search of food which causes villagers to kill the tigers to protect themselves and their livestock.

Inbreeding

Owing to depletion of forest lands, streaks of tigers get disconnected from each other by human territory which means that the range of tigers that other tigers can mate with reduces drastically.  Inbreeding with a small range of tigers weakens the gene pool, causing birth defects and mutations, which would eventually lead to extinction.

Poaching

While hunting tigers merely for sport has become almost non-existent, there are a lot of poachers who kill tigers to make money by selling tiger skins, bones and claws. Some honest forest guards and conservationists try to protect the tiger reserves, but in vain. It is believed that poachers are killing one tiger every day!


What can kids do to Save the Tiger!

Empower your child to believe that even ONE small person can make a big difference in the fight to save tigers from extinction. There are a multitude of things that kids can do to show their support. To begin with, you could enroll them in Kids for Tigers or any other Save the Tiger organisation. Here are some more suggestions for what kids can do:


Organise a Rally

Encourage your child to spread the “Save the Tiger” message by organising or participating in a rally. All he needs to do is invite a few of his and your friends who share the same interest and show their support with posters and pamphlets in support of the tiger in some public place.


Start a Petition

If tigers dwell in nearby forest, encourage and help your child to start a signature campaign to provide protection and declare the area as a tiger reserve. Create awareness about the area, the plight of the tigers and their importance in our eco-system. Get as many people as you can to sign the petition, and enlist the aid of a tiger conservation organisation to ensure that the local government hears your message loud and clear.


Establish or Join a Nature Club or NGO

Encourage your child to organise and invite family and friends, teachers and neighbours for activities like nature walks and bird-watching to make them appreciate and respect nature and the environment. You can also help him access images from a tiger conservation group and organise an audio-visual in his school to spread the “Save the Tiger” message.


Write to the Government and Newspapers

Help your child draft a letter to either the Prime Minister or the Chief Minister. Ask them to introduce measures and step up their efforts to “Save the Tiger.” In case you observe or know off any activity that will adversely affect the environment, report it to local newspapers to ensure that the wrong-doers do not get away with it.


Collect Money to fund Tiger Conservation Organisations

Encourage your child to think of innovative ways to collect money for tiger conservation. He could sell home-made cards, cakes or cookies, etc. during a fair or a sports day, etc. Help your child come up with various methods to collect money from your friends and family and donate it to a tiger conservation organisation.


Take Care of Mother Nature

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. Conserve water while brushing and showering; turn off the light when you leave a room; switch off the computer monitor if you are taking a break of more than ten minutes; use recycled paper; keep your air conditioner at 24 degrees. Choose cloth or paper bags over plastic bags. Save fuel - Walk, cycle, take public transport or start a carpool! All these small changes in your life will help you and your kids save Mother Nature and do your bit towards saving the Earth’s resources and by extension help “Save the Tiger.”


Do you know why you should worry if tigers are on the brink of extinction? How can you teach your child to be aware of and take care of Mother Nature? What can children do to Save the Tiger?
Discusshere.

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